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UNITED STATES
Savannah College of Art and Design Student Center Receives 2007 Preservation Award for Adaptive Reuse of Former B’nai Brith Congregation Building
ISJM, February 21, 2008.  
The 28,834-square-foot Congregation B’nai B’rith Synagogue was originally designed by South Carolina Architect Hyman Witcover and erected in 1909 as a four-story, exotic revival building.  It was later home to Saint Andrew’s Independent Episcopal Church, from 1970 to 2002.  The Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) acquired the building in 2003 and began work on a new student center.  Designed by Jairo Delgado Associates and constructed by the Carson Construction Company, the SCAD Student Center was opened in 2006 after a process of renovation and restoration.  The student center was awarded the 2007 Preservation Award by the Historic Savannah Foundation.   

ISRAEL
Stolen Art on Display in a Search for Owners
By Steven Erlanger

The New York Times, February 20, 2008
Jerusalem - In a remarkable feat of cooperation between France and Israel, requiring intensive negotiations and the passage of a law by the Israeli Parliament, the Israel Museum here has opened an exhibition of important art looted by the Nazis from France and then returned after the war. Some of it was never reclaimed, presumably because the owners were killed in the Holocaust.
link to article

ISRAEL
Hoping for a miracle, looted art exhibit opens
By David Brinn
The Jerusalem Post, February 19, 2008
Jerusalem - "What we expect from this exhibit is that a miracle will occur and someone will come here and say 'that belongs to me,'" French Minister of Culture and Communication Christine Albanel said Monday night in Jerusalem at the opening of an Israel Museum exhibit called Looking For Owners: Custody, Research, and Restitution of Art Stolen in France during World War II.
link to article


UNITED STATES
Manhattan Exhibit Honors Jewish Refugees In Dominic Republic
NY:1, February 18, 2008
New York - The Museum of Jewish Heritage will unveil a new exhibit Sunday focusing on a little known outpost of the faith. The exhibit is called "Sosua: A Refuge for Jews in the Dominican Republic."
The bilingual exhibition documents the plight of Jewish people that resettled in the country during the late 1930s to escape Nazi occupation and genocide.

link to article

IRELAND
'Emerald Isle' beckons Jews
By Peter Rothholz
JewishJournal.com, February 10, 2008
Dublin - There is a saying that in Ireland there are no strangers, only friends you haven't met yet.
On our visit we experienced a tangible expression of this in Kenmare, where perfect strangers went out of their way to help us get our laundry done and then volunteered to drive us back to our hotel when we couldn't find a taxi.
Encounters with ordinary folks are easy in Ireland, not only because there is no language barrier, but also because so many people have links to America and feel genuinely warm toward us.
Today, however, many of the people one meets in Ireland are not Irish. There are more than 300,000 Poles and countless thousands of other Continentals, many from Eastern Europe, in the country. A large number of these young men and women work in hotels and restaurants; being greeted by a receptionist with a Slavic accent becomes almost commonplace.

link to article

ENGLAND
Museum strikes a £4.3m deal
The Jewish Chronicle, January 25, 2008
London - The Jewish Museum took a step closer to its redevelopment this week, after agreeing a £4.3m deal with construction company Wallis for its refurbishment. The development, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, will triple the size of the museum’s current site in Camden. The museum, with a new 100-seat auditorium, is due to reopen in June 2009.
link to article

GERMANY
Berlin Jewish museum ups security
JTA, January 22, 2008
Berlin - Berlin's Jewish Museum is increasing its security following a terror alert for Jewish institutions in Germany.

The Jewish Museum, the most visited museum in Germany, is installing metal bollards outside the building as protection against possible terror attacks.
The German Interior Ministry would not confirm reports of the terror alert but Stephan Kramer, the secretary general of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, said security has been beefed up at all Jewish institutions in the country. He emphasized, however, that there was no need to panic.

link to article

UNITED STATES
Jewish-American Museum Rising in Philly
By Joseph Dennis Kelly
Architectural Record, January 22, 2008
Philadelphia - The Smithsonian-affiliated National Museum for American Jewish History (NMAJH), the nation’s only museum documenting the Jewish-American experience, has assiduously expanded its collection from 40 objects, when it opened in 1976, to more than 20,000. In doing so, it has outgrown the meager 6,000 square feet of exhibition space in its current home, a half-block from the spot on Philadelphia’s Independence Mall where it is constructing a new 100,000-square-foot complex designed by Polshek Partnership. NMAJH hopes that when the $150 million space opens on July 4, 2010, it will be able to expand its programming and quintuple its attendance to 250,000 visitors a year.

link to article

CANADA
Snapshots of a lost world
By Sarah Milroy
globeandmail.com, January 17, 2008

Hamilton - An exhibition at the McMaster Museum of Art showcases revered photographer Roman Vishniac's images of traditional Jewish life in Eastern Europe on the eve of the Second World War. And it has an unexpected familial twist… 
link to article
link to UJA

ENGLAND
Holocaust exhibit opens
By Marc Shoffman
TotallyJewish.com, January 16, 2008
London - London Mayor Ken Livingstone has described an exhibition on the lives of Polish Jews before the Holocaust as “haunting” ahead of its opening at City Hall. Featuring photographs of children playing, families eating dinner and Jews praying, “And I Still See Their Faces – Images of Polish Jews" arrived at the prestigious London venue after being seen by audiences in Los Angeles, Mexico, Hamburg, New York and Jerusalem.
link to article


ISRAEL
World’s first Holocaust museum was founded by survivors
By Sheldon Kirsher  
The Canadian Jewish News, January 10, 2008
Kibbutz Lochamei Hageta’ot - The Ghetto Fighters’ Museum in this kibbutz, one kilometre north of Acre and six kilometres south of Nahariya, is the granddaddy of all Holocaust museums. Tamir Porter, an official in its overseas department, describes it as the world’s first Holocaust museum. It was founded in 1949 by survivors of ghettos and veterans of partisan bands to commemorate compatriots lost in the Holocaust.
link to article


LITHUANIA
Red Synagogue in Joniskis Collapsed
ISJM, January 8, 2008
ISJM has just received news that the Red Synagogue in Joniskis has collapsed.  The Red Synagogue was built 1865.  The building collapsed in December leaving one wall with the aaron ha kodesh still standing. 
A restoration project for the synagogue was the recipient of a $25,000 grant from the World Monuments Fund in 2004. There is talk of rebuilding the synagogue, however, the community may not be able to come up with the funding necessary for such a project.

AUSTRIA
Police investigate desecration of 101 graves at Vienna's main cemetery
ynet news, January 4, 2008
Austrian authorities said Friday they were searching for the vandals responsible for desecrating 101 graves at Vienna's main cemetery. According to investigators, the vandalism occurred overnight, and that 25 of the graves were in the Jewish sector of the cemetery. Police said tombstones were toppled, iron crosses were bent and lanterns were destroyed atop the graves at the Vienna Central Cemetery, the Austrian capital's largest graveyard. Investigators were examining footprints and possible DNA evidence at the scene, in hopes of tracking down those responsible, authorities said in a statement. They said the evidence at the scene suggested two people were involved. Several Jewish cemeteries in Europe were desecrated over the past few months. In October, 64 tombstones were destroyed in the Jewish cemetery in Siberia; while in August, 100 headstones in a Jewish cemetery in southern Poland were spray painted with swastikas and Nazi slogans.
link to article

GERMANY
German museum to screen Nazi hate movie
The Earth Times, December 15, 2007
Stuttgart - A German museum has announced plans for 16 screenings of the ultimate Nazi hate movie, Jud Suess, as part of an exhibition picking apart how Nazi propaganda worked. The 1940 costume melodrama was used to stoke up hatred of Jews in 21 nations. It was a favourite of Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels, who had funded it. "The film is an overwhelming success. The audience was seething," he gloated in his diary in 1940. "This is the first really anti- Semitic film."
link to article


RUSSIA
St. Petersburg Jewish history exhibit opens
JTA, December 14, 2007
St. Petersburg - A permanent exhibition on Jewish history and culture opened at the St. Petersburg Museum of Ethnography. The exhibit, which opened Wednesday, is titled “The History and Culture of Jews in Russia.” It arises from a 2003 agreement between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Israel’s then-Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. According to Interfax, a Russian news agency, over 2,500 items on permanent display will cover the breadth of Jewish history, from its beginnings through life in the Pale of Settlement, home to more than a third of the world’s Jews at the beginning of the 20th century.
link to article


UNITED STATES
Legends and lies
By Sam Hall Kaplan
Jewish Journal.com, December 14, 2007
Philadelphia - If the plans follow the promises of its sponsors, the site of the next preeminent national Jewish institution will be in the historic heart of Philadelphia. There, steps from the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall, edging a revitalized Independence Mall, the proposed National Museum of American Jewish History is to begin construction early next year for its target completion date of July 4, 2010.
link to article


UNITED STATES
Curbed Inside: Contemporary Jewish Museum
By Jimmy Stamp
Curbed, December 11, 2007
San Francisco - Opening in June 2008, San Francisco's Contemporary Jewish Museum will become the latest knot in the tallis of starchitect Daniel Liebeskind. The strikingly blue metal-clad structure, which has been slowly rising across from Yerba Beuna Park on Mission street, is based on the form of the Hebrew word l'chaim, meaning "to life." This new form has been integrated into the shell of the 1907 Jessie Street Power Substation, designed by Willis Polk during the City Beautiful movement. In Libeskind's own words, the Contemporary Jewish Museum "will transform the physical energy associated with the legacy of the Power Substation to the power of human communication and imagination." So...you know, there's that. Moving on to matters of a less conceptual nature, Curbed had a chance to check out the interior of broken blue cube and we were pleasantly surprised with what we saw. Let's start with the lobby, and just for fun, we'll compare a few of these images to their original renderings.
link to article

UNITED STATES
Virtual Shul
By Eli Rosenblatt
Forward, December 11, 2007
New York - So when, in 1994, a synagogue in the northern German city of Luebeck was torched by young men between the ages of 19 and 24 who had antisemitic motives, the aftershocks were felt far and wide, including in Darmstadt, where a muscular denunciation began in the corridors of the Darmstadt University of Technology. In response to the attack, a group of architecture students and their professors began a project to virtually reconstruct one of Germany’s 3,000 destroyed synagogues by using CAD, or computer-aided design. The result is an Internet- and museum-quality exhibit of 14 synagogues destroyed by the Nazis, recently shown at the Rosenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies of the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. “With the virtual reconstruction of the synagogues destroyed in the Reichspogromnacht (known as Kristallnacht) the students wish to remember and admonish, while sending a signal of their own way of thinking and acting,” said Manfred Koob, the venture’s founder and director.
link to article

UNITED STATES
Two Museums Go to Court Over the Right to Picassos

By Carol Vogel
New York Times, December 8, 2007
New York - In a legal strategy that is spreading in the art world, the Museum of Modern Art and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation jointly asked a federal court yesterday to declare them the owners of two Picasso paintings that a claimant says were sold under duress in Nazi Germany. A request for declaratory judgment, filed in Federal District Court in Manhattan, involves “Boy Leading a Horse” (1906), donated to MoMA in 1964 by William S. Paley, the founder of CBS, and “Le Moulin de la Galette” (1900), given to the Guggenheim in 1963 by the art dealer Justin K. Thannhauser. The museums asked the court to declare that the paintings had never been part of a forced sale and rightfully belong to them. “Both museums feel this claim is without merit,” said Thomas Krens, director of the Guggenheim. “This is a serious issue, and we want to take the most direct path to confirm it.”
link to article

UNITED STATES
Freedom will ring at new, bigger Jewish history museum

By Kim Mulford
Courier Post, December 8, 2007
Philadelphia - The National Museum of American Jewish History will break ground this month on its new 100,000-square-foot, six-story home on Independence Mall in Philadelphia. Opening day is set for July 4, 2010. The $130 million museum will highlight more than 350 years of Jewish contributions to American life. The Smithsonian affiliate now shares space with Congregation Mikvah Israel, one of the first organized congregations in the country. It will be situated one block from Independence Hall and directly across from the Liberty Bell. That's the perfect spot to showcase the results of religious freedom, said Eva Schlanger of Cherry Hill.
link to article

UNITED STATES
Judaica Auction at Sotheby's
An Auction of rare and antique Judaica ceremonial objects, silver, art, antiques, manuscripts and books will be held at Sotheby's New York on Dec 19, 2007.
Click here for more details and online catalogue


UNITED STATES
Eldridge Street Synagogue Restoration Complete, Synagogue Reopened

Hundreds joined us on December 2 to celebrate the re-opening of the Eldridge Street Synagogue. We hope you enjoy the news pieces below that have covered this milestone occasion, and thank you for being a part of this landmark effort.

MUSEUM AT ELDRIDGE STREET PUBLIC HOURS
Sunday to Thursday 10 am to 4 PM
To support this landmark project, email ebrune@eldridgestreet.org
For more information, call 212.219.0888 Or visit our website at www.eldridgestreet.org


News Links:

New York Times

Return of a Long Dormant Island of Grace, Edward Rothstein
New Yorker
Face-Lift, Adam Gopnik
WNYC Radio
Eldridge Street Synagogue Restoration Complete, Richard Hake
Associated Press
Historic NYC Synagogue is Reborn, Karen Matthews
New York Post
Back to Shul, Rita Delfiner
New York Daily News
Lower East Side Synagogue Returned to Glory, Jess Wisloski
NY1
Repairs Finished On Eldridge Street Synagogue
Jewish Week
Everyone's Lower East Side Shul, Diane Cole

GERMANY
Where Once They Burned Books…
By Hinda Mandell
Forward, December 05, 2007
Berlin - Most Jewish-related anniversaries in Germany are commemorations of tragedy. But this season marked 25 years since the establishment of a remarkable postwar creation — a feat of hope and foresight happily enjoying continued success. Located steps away from the shopping district on Kurfürstendamm, the Literaturhandlung is one of seven shops throughout Germany that make up the country’s only chain of Jewish bookstores. Taken together, these shops offer a small but symbolic retort to that dark chapter in German history, when books — and then, of course, people — were publicly burned. Indeed, three miles from Berlin’s Literaturhandlung is a plaque memorializing one of the most iconic days in this particular dark chapter: the May 10, 1933, burning of some 20,000 condemned tomes at the square later known as Bebelplatz.
link to article

ISRAEL
Ben-Zvi Institute calls for return of Aleppo Codex fragments
By Anshel Pfeffer
Haaretz, December 5, 2007
Scholars at Yad Ben-Zvi research institute in Jerusalem have called on Jews around the world who originally come from Aleppo, Syria and may possess fragments of the ancient Aleppo Codex to turn them over to Israel.

The call came Sunday at an event marking the 60th anniversary of riots against the Jews in Aleppo during which most of the codex, the authoritative copy of the Hebrew Bible written in the 10th century, was lost.
link to article

ISRAEL
History of Italy's Jews on display in Ramat Aviv
By Helen Kaye

Jerusalem Post, December 3, 2007

Jews and Italy go together like pasta and parmesan. True, there aren't many Jews living in Italy (only about 27,000 today), but they've been there a long, long time. Over the past 2000 years, Jews in Italy have been slaves, vintners, physicians, composers, scholars and everything in between. They've been courted by princes, persecuted by the Church, expelled and readmitted according to the ecclesiastical or political temper of the times. In short, Jews have left their mark on Italy and vice versa. This history is documented in Italia Ebraica, a truly unique exhibition of some 200 items that runs from December 4 - February 28 at the Eretz Israel Museum in Ramat Aviv. It covers the figurative arts, literature, music, publishing and science, divided among eight illuminating sections. It starts with "The Voyage," how the Jews first ended up in Italy, and ends with visual arts. In between there's "Life Denied and Regained" that covers attitudes towards the Jews from the Middle Ages to the Holocaust and "Public and Private Life" that catalogues the Jewish people and their doings.

link to article

UNITED STATES
G
leaming new building houses Chicago Jewish museum
By John DeBaun
JSOnline, December 1, 2007
Chicago - The public museum at the Spertus Institute, a longtime center for Jewish studies and programs in Chicago, is getting a big boost this weekend with its reopening in a new $55 million building that adds another architectural gem to Chicago's lakefront.

link to article

UNITED STATES
Art stars of David
There isn’t a Chagall in sight in the “new” Spertus Museum’s first show.
By Lauren Weinberg

Time Out Chicago, November 29, 2007
Chicago - There’s an old joke that says, “Two Jews, three opinions.” The 16 Jews in “The New Authentics: Artists of the Post-Jewish Generation” present significantly more than 24—hardly surprising when you consider their diverse perspectives. Most were born in the 1960s or 1970s, but their levels of Jewish education and affiliation vary: A few grew up in observant families; others have a non-Jewish parent; a couple are converts. Some are people of color. Several are from Chicago, but the majority live in Los Angeles, New York City or Europe. Some engage Jewish concerns or values directly; others don’t seem to address religion or ethnicity at all. Senior curator Staci Boris explains that this multicultural, eclectic assemblage is exactly what she wanted for the inaugural exhibition at the Spertus Museum’s new facility. “It needed to explore American-Jewish identity in the 21st century,” she says. “What does it mean to be Jewish today?”
link to article


AUSTRIA
Exhibition “The Korngolds” at the Jewish Museum in Vienna

EJP, November 22, 2007
By Sarah Nathan-Whyte
Vienna - The name of Erich Wolfgang Korngold probably still carries more resonance in Hollywood today than in Europe despite the fact that the composer was born into the life of the highest musical credentials of Central European culture in 1897. Although officially Austrian he was actually born in Brno, Czechoslovakia, in 1897. His father Julius Korngold was considered both the most influential and dreaded journalist of the time, writing for none other than Theodor Herzl, who employed him as music critic of one of the leading German language newspapers of the day, Die Neue Freie Presse. His son, Erich, was a child prodigy whose talents were, at an early age, compared to those of Mozart...no doubt having a father as a critic did him no harm according to the gossip of the day. His father coached him in the early days and by age 12 his Piano Trio was performed and published soon after.
link to article

UNITED STATES
Return to shul evokes the miracle of Chanukah
By Bryan Schwartzman, Staff Writer
Jewish Exponent, November 22, 2007
Philadelphia - For seven long months, the synagogue building was essentially off-limits: Chaos and disrepair had ensued as the result of severe water damage due to internal flooding. And for the members and staff of Congregation B'nai Abraham, it seemed like an exile of sorts. So does that mean that the return to the historic 97-year-old building on Lombard Street in Society Hill makes this Turkey Day a little more stuffed with nachas?
link to article


ENGLAND
Design shares in £9m Jewish Museum revamp
By Gina Lovett
Design Week, November 21, 2007
London - A radical redesign of The Jewish Museum in London is set to throw up a host of graphic design opportunities over the next six months. The museum, which is in the throes of a three-stage overhaul that will triple the space at its flagship site, is about to embark on a refurbishment, followed by a rebrand. The timescale for this is yet to be decided, according to the exhibition project leader Sarah Jillings. Design consultancy Event Communications is already working on the reinterpretation and redesign of exhibition space, while architect Long & Kentish has been working to unify the two buildings the museum now owns. Other design appointments will follow next year, when tenders for exhibition graphics, signage and branding will be posted in the Official Journal of the European Union.
link to article

UNITED STATES
Spertus now showcase from top to bottom
10-story Institute of Jewish Studies draws visitors inside

By William Mullen, Tribune staff reporter
Chicago Tribune, November 21, 2007
Chicago - It used to be that you had to look pretty carefully at the buildings in the 600 block of South Michigan Avenue if you wanted to find the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies, housed in a nondescript little office building next to a vacant lot. Officials of the 82-year-old institution expect to be noticed a lot more now that they have moved into an eye-popping new glass-fronted, 10-story headquarters at 610 S. Michigan Ave., site of the former vacant lot.
link to article


UNITED STATES

Jewish Federation to create museum endowment
bizjournals, November 16, 2007
Milwaukee - The Milwaukee Jewish Federation plans to use a $1 million bequest from the estate of Jacob Bernheim to create a new endowment fund for the planned Jewish Museum Milwaukee. The Jewish Museum Milwaukee/Jacob Bernheim Memorial Endowment Fund will generate about $60,000 per year for support of the Jewish Museum Milwaukee's operating budget, the Federation said Friday. The fund will be in the Jewish Community Foundation, the endowment development program of the Milwaukee Jewish Federation.
link to article

UNITED STATES

Too many menorahs? From gifts for pivotal life moments to collection
Canadian Press, November 14, 2007
Deborah Raice Fox didn't set out to collect menorahs. The menorahs came to her. Now she has upwards of 20 - some for display, others for lighting. Over the years, many Jewish families find themselves accumulating more menorahs than family members. The Hanukkah lamps arrive in the form of gifts for pivotal life moments like bar and bat mitzvahs and weddings. "I think most people get a lot (of menorahs) inadvertently," Raice Fox said. "I didn't wake up one day and say, 'I want to be a menorah collector,' but as you progress in years, your collection becomes more dramatic and unique." The inspiration for the ritual of lighting the lamps dates back more than 1,800 years to a battle in which ancient Israelis reclaimed a temple from the ruling Greeks, spurring eight days of festivities. The Hanukkah holiday now involves lighting a candle for eight continuous days, and menorahs are often passed from generation to generation.
link to article


POLAND

Germany gives 5 million euros to Polish-Jewish museum
AFP, November 13, 2007
Warsaw - Germany has donated five million euros (7.3 million dollars) to help build a new Jewish history museum in the Polish capital Warsaw, home to Europe’s largest Jewish community before the Holocaust.
link to article

UKRAINE
Lien issued on Reb Nachman's grave

JTA, November 8, 2007
Breslov Chasidim could lose control of the land surrounding their founder's grave in Ukraine. At issue is a debt owed to a local businessman in Uman who is a member of the Ukranian parliament. Members of the Breslov community have threatened to protest and disrupt next week's visit to Israel by President Victor Yuschenko if the issue is not resolved.. Four years ago, a Breslov foundation that oversees community facilities in Uman hired a company to reconstruct and expand the synagogue near the grave of the dynasty's founder, Reb Nachman. A contract dispute broke out between the company, owned by Pyotr Kuzmenko, who sued the foundation and had a lien issued on the synagogue and grave site. The synagogue will be sold to cover the lien.
link to article

CZECH REPUBLIC

Exhibition on Czech Jews opens in European Parliament
ČTK, November 8, 2007
Brussels - A new exhibition focusing on the persecution and tragic fates of Czech Jews during World War Two and under the post-war Czechoslovak communist regime has opened in the European Parliament (EP), Jan Kratochvil, one of the exhibition's authors, told CTK Wednesday. The exhibition will be on display in the EP for two weeks and then it will move to the Czech permanent representation to the EU in Brussels and later to other Czech diplomatic offices in other parts of the world.
link to article

ALBANIA
Sheltered from the Nazis in Albania

By Greer Fay Cashman
Jerusalem Post, November 3, 2007
Albania was the only country in Europe in which there were more Jews after the war than there had been before the war, American photographer Norman Gershman said on Thursday at Yad Vashem. He spoke at the opening of his exhibition honoring Muslim Albanians who rescued Jews during the Holocaust. Gershman, who is Jewish, and who lives and works in Aspen, Colorado, has spent four years traveling the length and breadth of Albania to photograph families who provided a haven for Jews during the Holocaust years.
link to article

GERMANY
Germany starts work on exhibit at site of Nazi SS, Gestapo HQ

By The Associated Press
Haaretz, November 2, 2007 
Berlin - The German government on Friday started construction of an exhibition center at the site where the Gestapo, leaders of the SS and other top officials in Adolf Hitler's police state presided over Nazi-era crimes. "The site stands like no other place in Berlin for terror and genocide," Berlin Mayor Klaus Wowereit told reporters while marking the start of work. With the new center, he said, one of the most important, authentic places of remembrance in Berlin Your browser may not support display of this image.will gain in stature. The functional glass-and-metal structure, a single-story pavilion designed by German architect Ursula Wilms, will complete a memorial known as the Topography of Terror at what was one of the centers of Nazi power. It should be opened on May 8, 2010 - the 65th anniversary of Nazi Germany's final surrender.
link to article

POLAND
Poland's Jews Plan to Build Skyscraper
By Vanessa Gera
(Associated Press)
Washington Post, November 1, 2007
Warsaw - Poland's Jewish leaders have unveiled plans for a glass skyscraper in a neighborhood that was the heart of the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II. The building - projected to rise 680 feet high - would tower over the elegant Nozyk synagogue, Warsaw's only remaining synagogue, dramatically altering the look of the historic neighborhood.

link to article

UKRAINE

Unearthing mass graves unveils history
By Michael J. Jordan
JTA, November 1, 2007
Bershad - Marking and memorializing the Nazi killing fields of Eastern European Jews makes for far more than a macabre historical footnote. The fieldwork and research paints a clearer picture of how many Jews died during the Holocaust.
In May, Ukrainian workers laying a gas pipe in a southern village dug into a buried chamber of thousands of Jews killed during the Holocaust. That same month, a construction crew building a new office complex in western Ukraine burrowed into the corpses of several dozen more Jews. Stumbling upon such mass graves is not particularly unusual in Eastern Europe. Less well known is how many more “martyr sites” lie undiscovered and unmarked in fields and forests across the region – wherever mobile Nazi killing units scorched the earth in the so-called “Holocaust of bullets.” It seems momentum is growing in the search for such sites.

link to article

EUROPE

European Day of Jewish Culture 2007 a resounding success
ISJM, Oct 29, 2007
The European Council of Jewish Communities (ECJC) reports on the success of the recent Europan Day of Jewish Cultuire, held across Europe on Septemebr 2, 2007. According to the ECJC over 200,000 people in 30 cities across Europe took part in site visits and special events. The ECJC reports "The chosen theme, "Testimonies", proved an absolute success with over fifteen thousand volunteers and institutional persons working together to make this event happen. Some highlights include the participation of Portugal which joined the network offering a number of extremely interesting proposals. Turkey, which did not participate last year, attracted some 2,500 visitors. Once again, Spain proved to be one of the stars of the project attracting 74, 000 visitors in one day. In the UK, the synagogues in London's East End were brimming with visitors, many of whom were non-Jewish. The Annual General Meeting of the Jewish East End Celebration Society, at the East London Central Synagogue - attended by Jonathan Joseph, President of the European Council of Jewish Communities and Baroness Sarah Ludford, MEP for London and Henry Grunwald, President of the Board of Deputies - highlighted the importance of new projects to rescue archives and preserve Jewish heritage in the area. Bernard Kops, the well-known Jewish author and playwright, reminisced about his early life in the East End." The European Day of Jewish Culture is co-organised by B'nai B'rith Europe, the European Council of Jewish Communities and Red de Juderías de España.

CZECH REPUBLIC
Exhibition in the Robert Guttmann Gallery at the Jewish Museum in Prague – “Hope Is on the Next Page” 100 Years of the Library of the Jewish Museum in Prague
ISJM, October 29, 2007
9 August – 21 October 2007 Open daily 9 a.m. – 6 p.m., except Saturdays and Jewish holidays
U Staré školy 3, Prague 1 (rear tract of the Spanish Synagogue), tel. 221 711 553
Prague - The story of the museum’s library begins in 1858 with the founding of the Library of the Prague Jewish Religious Community, which opened in 1874 under the supervision of Nathan Grün. This now constitutes the historic core of the museum’s book collection. The Jewish Museum in Prague (1906–1940) was founded in 1906 in connection with the clearance of the Prague ghetto, and books formed an integral part of its collections.

link to article


UNITED STATES
Contemporary Jewish Museum Opens New Libeskind Designed Building on June 8, 2008

Dexigner, October 27, 2007
San Francisco - The Contemporary Jewish Museum (CJM) will open its new Daniel Libeskind designed building on Sunday, June 8, 2008. The new facility - located on Mission Street in downtown San Francisco's Yerba Buena cultural district - is an adaptive reuse of the landmark 1907 Jessie Street Power Substation with an extension clad in vibrant blue steel panels.
link to article

SLOVAKIA
Slovakia Jewish Heritage Route Inaugurated

The Route is implemented by: The Slovak Jewish Heritage Center Kozia 18, 814 47 Bratislava, Slovakia, heritage@znoba.sk 
The new Slovak Jewish Heritage Route preserves and promotes Jewish heritage in Slovakia and serves as the Slovak associate of the European Routes of Jewish Heritage. The route includes sites in Bratislava,
Šamorín, Nitra, Spišské Podhradie, Košice, Prešov, and Bardejov.
link to slovak jewish heritage

UNITED STATES

Rediscovering Modern Synagogues Before it is Too Late, by Samuel Gruber, president of  ISJM
docomomo fall newsletter
American Jewish congregations were among the first to embrace modern architecture for religious buildings. The demographic shift to the suburbs in the post-war period really began the embrace of modernism by mainstream American Judaism—a love affair that remains strong, even though the definition of what is “modern” is less clear.
link to article in pdf
Docomomo promotes the study, interpretation and protection of the architecture, landscape and urban design of the Modern Movement.
link to docomomo

GIBRALTAR
Jewish Heritage in Gibraltar
An Architectural Guide published by Sharman Kadish for the Jewish Heritage UK
published by Spire Books Ltd
ISBN 978-1-904965-12-1
The Rock of Gibraltar has been a haven for Jews since its capture by the British in 1704, Catholic Spain having expelled them from its shores in 1492.  By the mid-18th century, about a third of the population of Gibraltar was Jewish, adding to the richly cosmopolitan mix of the free port.  Today Christians, Muslims, Jews and Hindus,  from England, Spain, Portugal, Italy, North Africa and India live side by side in Gibraltar.  Now the Gibraltar Jewish community - Sephardim mostly from Morocco - is some 600 strong and its four historic synagogues are all still in use.  They form a rare legacy in Europe having been untouched by the ravages of the Second World War.  Discover Jewish heritage in Gibraltar with this  first-ever authoritative  guidebook featuring full-colour photographs, drawings and an architectural heritage trail.  Sharman Kadish is Director of Jewish Heritage UK.  There are maps and drawings by architect Barbara Bowman and specially commissioned photography by Nigel Corrie of English Heritage. 
link to Jewish Heritage UK

UKRAINE

Ukraine to return seized Torah scrolls
United Press International, October 27, 2007
Kiev - Ukrainian President Victor Yuschenko signed a decree Wednesday the 24th, pledging the return of all government-held religious property, especially Torah scrolls held in state archives. The decree, signed after Yuschenko met with Ukraine's Jewish leaders to discuss government measures to combat anti-Semitism, says the scrolls are to be returned to the Jewish community, JTA reported Friday.
link to article


HOLLAND
Doing 'business' with the Nazis
By Dinah Spritzer
JTA, October 14, 2007
Amsterdam - An unusual twist in one of the largest restitution claims for Nazi-era art may complicate the recovery efforts by the heirs of a Dutch Jewish art dealer. The claim covers some 227 artworks, including pieces by the Old Masters, that the four children of Nathan Katz claim he lost to the Nazis during World War II. The Dutch state took possession of the works after the war, installing them in galleries and museums. The catch, however, is that the Nazis may have obtained the paintings legally. Unlike in many other restitution cases, an unknown number of the works the Katz heirs are seeking to recover were not confiscated but sold, possibly at market value.
link to article


PORTUGAL
Lisbon Jewish Cemetery Vandalized
EJC, September 26, 2007
Lisbon - On the 25th of September, the cemetery of the Lisbon Jewish community was vandalized by a group of Portuguese youth belonging to an extreme right movement. Accordin to the local Jewish community, 17 tombstones were desecrated and marked with Nazi swastikas. Due to the prompt intervention of the local police, the perpetrators were apprehended on the spot.
link to article


ITALY

Milan railway station to host Holocaust memorial
By Lisa Jucca
Reuters, September 18, 2007
Milan - Milan central railway station's notorious Platform 21, which witnessed the deportation of hundreds of Jews in 1943-45, will host the city's first Holocaust memorial, local authorities said. The museum, to open in two years' time, will occupy 6,000 square meters of the underground rail network in Milan where hundreds of Jews from Milan and nearby were gathered to be sent to Nazi death camps such as Auschwitz and Dachau.
link to article


GERMANY
Opening of the New Glass Courtyard at the Jewish Museum Berlin
ISJM, September 17, 2007
Berlin - The new Glass Courtyard at the Jewish Museum Berlin will be opened on the evening of 25 September. Addresses will be held by Museum Director W. Michael Blumenthal, Minister of State Bernd Neumann, and the architect Daniel Libeskind. Prominent figures from the worlds of politics, business, and culture will attend.
The Jewish Museum Berlin would also like to celebrate gaining this new, attractive events venue with the Berliners the weekend following the opening. The opening of the Glass Courtyard to the public will take place on 29 and 30 September, when the Museum invites visitors to view the new room, visit all exhibitions, and take part in guided tours free of charge. Furthermore, Michael Nyman, the composer famed for the soundtrack for "The Piano," will perform "Ein Song für Charlotte Salomon" (A Song for Charlotte Salomon) in a concert on 29 September. A press invitation to the public opening and the concert as well as further information will be sent out in the near future.
See the press releases here

UNITED STATES

Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington Purchases New Home, Will Co-Sponsor Conference in November
ISJM, September 14, 2007

Washington, DC - A "new" 100-year-old building provides program space within steps of the historic 1876 synagogue. The Society will co-host part of the annual conference of the nearby Southern Jewish Historical Society, which will take place November 1-4. An exhibition on Jewish Washington will be on display in the Social Hall of the JHSGW's newly purchased synagogue on November 2nd.
For more info on the JHSGW's new home, see the press release here
For more info on the SJHS's November conference, see the complete brochure here


BELARUS
Historic Yeshiva Faces Uncertain Future
By Rukhl Schaechter
Forward , 2007
Volozhin - A jewel of Eastern European life has been returned to Jewish hands, but will the community be up to the task of holding on to it? This is the dilemma facing the Jewish community of Belarus, which has been struggling to maintain the building that once housed the historic Volozhiner Yeshiva. Two months ago, authorities in Volozhin, located 55 miles from the capital city of Minsk, threatened to take over the structure if Jewish communal leaders couldn’t raise the $20,000 needed to renovate it. They gathered the money, but a new challenge seems to have emerged: disagreement over exactly what to do with the building.
link to article


AUSTRIA
One of Europe's oldest Jewish cemeteries awaits salvation
By Philippe Schwab
EJP, September 7, 2007
Vienna - Forgotten behind its high walls, one of Europe’s most important 19th-century Jewish cemeteries, now dilapidated, desperately awaits salvation after years of indifference on the part of Viennese authorities.
link to article


ENGLAND

Cultural day of celebration attracts 10,000
By Dana Gloger
The Jewish Chronicle, September 7, 2007
London - More than 10,000 people throughout Britain took part in events on Sunday to mark the annual European Day of Jewish Culture, exploring Anglo-Jewish history through guided walks, exhibitions and lectures among other pursuits.
link to article

UNITED STATES
Pissarro’s Unquiet Pastoral
By Jeannie Rosenfeld
Forward, September 5, 2007
New York - This fall, the Jewish Museum of New York is mounting its first show dedicated to Camille Pissarro, who founded the Impressionist movement and is its only Jewish artist.
link to article

ISRAEL
Recovering masterpieces
By Tom Tugend
The Jerusalem Post, September 5, 2007
Jerusalem - New documentary shows heroic young art lovers fighting back to rescue art stolen from Jews by the Nazis. More than 60 years after the fall of the Third Reich, the fallout from the great Nazi robbery is continuing, with thousands of art works still missing or sought by their original, largely Jewish, owners. The story, as meticulously tracked in the two-hour documentary, The Rape of Europa, is complex, but even those unenthused by visits to galleries or museums will find the plotline riveting.
link to article

UNITED STATES
Exhibit on Jewish artist-feminist Judy Chicago at JMM
Washington Jewish Week, September 5, 2007
Baltimore - An exhibit on feminist artist Judy Chicago will open at the Jewish Museum of Maryland in Baltimore Sunday.
Judy Chicago: Jewish Identity explores how the artist's Jewish roots influenced her work.
Best known for "The Dinner Party," a 1970s multimedia work honoring important women throughout history, Chicago was born Judith Sylvia Cohen into a family that descended from Eastern European rabbis.

link to article

UNITED STATES
The Possibility Of Renewal
A historic D.C. synagogue finds new life
By Jenna Weissman-Joselit
Forward, September 04, 2007
Washington D.C. - If there’s one strain that runs consistently throughout Jewish history, it’s that of loss: loss of people, places, institutions, languages, sensibilities and identities. Given this litany of woe, I have often thought that the notion of “once upon a time” seemed more apt for the Jews than for the characters of fairytales. Occasionally, though, something breaks the mold, bucks the trend and thumbs its nose at the crushing weight of the past, substituting gain for loss, presence for absence. That something, I’m happy to report, is the Sixth and I Historic Synagogue, a restored synagogue-cum-“Jewish meeting place” in downtown Washington, D.C. — an institution whose very name grounds it in the here-and-now and situates it squarely within the grid of urban life. There’s also a magical, indeterminate quality about the place, which way back when in 1907 started out as the second home of Adas Israel.
link to article


GERMANY
Restored synagogue marks Jewish revival in Germany
By Catherine Bosley and Adam Williams
Washington Times, September 1, 2007
Berlin - Germany's biggest synagogue, a century-old landmark that was torched by the Nazis and neglected in communist East Berlin, reopened its doors yesterday in the latest sign of the country's Jewish revival.
link to article


UNITED STATES
State of the Art: Finding the heirs
By Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Jerusalem Post, August 31, 2007
New York - Genealogists and art organizations collaborate to locate heirs of Nazi-era art looted, confiscated or sold by force.
link to article


UNITED STATES
Groundbreaking Exhibition of Jewish Life in Pre-Holocaust Poland Premiers at Judah L. Magnes Museum
Yahoo, August 31, 2007
Berkeley, CA - They Called Me Mayer July, the first major exhibition of Mayer Kirshenblatt's painting in the United States, will debut at the Judah L. Magnes Museum next month. The exhibition will run from September 9, 2007 to January 13, 2008. It will open with a special program and book signing by the artist.

link to article

GERMANY
Germany's Biggest Synagogue Reopens
Spiegel, August 31, 2007
Berlin - In a sign of the renaissance of Germany's Jewish community, the country's biggest synagogue is to re-open this Friday in Berlin. But the presence of armed guards outside brings to mind the specters of the past and the dangers that still persist.
link to article


SPAIN
Pre-1492 cemetery found in Spain
By Reevan Trupin
JTA, August 30, 2007
Barcelona - Bones dating back to the Middle Ages or earlier that were discovered in what once was a Jewish cemetery in a small Spanish town were reburied in a Barcelona cemetery.
link to article


SPAIN
Remains discovered in Spanish 14th century cemetery returned to Jewish community
By Linda Jiménez Glassman
EJP, August 30, 2007
Madrid - The remains of 158 skeletons from the 14th century Jewish cemetery in Tarrega, Spain, have been handed over to the Jewish community in Barcelona to be reburied in the local Collserola cemetery.
link to article


ISRAEL

Haifa Synagogue In Arab Neighborhood Has Fallen Into Disrepair
By IsraelNN TV Staff
Arutz Sheva, August 9, 2007
The once flourishing Hadar neighborhood synagogue in Haifa has fallen into disrepair. Once central to Jewish life, the synagogue is no longer in use since Arabs moved in, and the Jews moved out.
link to article


ENGLAND
A London synagogue was awarded English National Heritage Site status.
JTA, August 9, 2007
London - The New West End Synagogue, built in 1879, was a historically listed property, but with its new national monument status, the government will now be responsible for the building's upkeep. Also, the congregation and local community can request funding for necessary renovations. The new status puts the synagogue on par with other national heritage sites such as Big Ben, Stonehenge and the Houses of Parliament. In the written status upgrade decision Simon Thurley, chief executive of English Heritage said, "The New West End Synagogue is the architectural highwater mark of Anglo-Jewish architecture." Britain's first synagogue, the Bevis Marks Synagogue, which was built in 1701 on London's East End, is the only other British synagogue to have received National Heritage status.
link to article


ENGLAND
It’s official: New West End is a national treasure
By Leon Symons
The Jewish Chronicle, August 9, 2007
London - London’s New West End Synagogue has become a national treasure after being designated a Grade 1 listed building —only the second synagogue in Britain to be given the award. The Bayswater synagogue joins Bevis Marks in the City of London as one of the top three per cent of buildings of historic and architectural interest in the country. Its elevation was courtesy of the Victorian Society, which argued that the quality of the building, built in 1879 by architect George Ashdown Audsley, put it on a par with the finest Victorian churches in the country.
link to article


GERMANY
German anti-Semitism exhibit aims to show hatred isn't limited to history.
By Toby Axelrod
JTA, August 9, 2007
Berlin - Unlike during the Third Reich, these images on public display are not official German propaganda but part of a German government exhibition on contemporary anti-Semitism that aims to show that anti-Jewish sentiment in the German Republic, and in Europe generally, is not just a relic of the past.
link to article


POLAND
Jewish cemetery desecrated in Poland
EJP, August 6, 2007
Warsaw - A Jewish cemetery in southern Poland has been desecrated with around 100 tombstones daubed with anti-Semitic slogans and Nazi symbols, police said Monday. Police spokesman Adam Gaska said that the perpetrators were believed to be local youths, and that a criminal investigation had been opened in Czestochowa in the country’s south.
link to article


UNITED STATES
Show at the Maltz Museum illuminates the neglected work of Hungarian artists.

By Steven Litt
The Plain Dealer, August 5, 2007
Cleveland - Drawn from the collection of Nancy G. Brinker, the U.S. ambassador to Hungary from 2001 to 2003, the exhibition, "Hungarian Artists: Works of Passion, Interludes and Progress," provides a rare glimpse of the extraordinary artistic ferment in Hungary from the late 19th century to the present.
link to article


UNITED STATES
Broad gives $1 million to Jewish history museum

JTA, August 3, 2007
Philadelphia - Billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad will give $1 million to the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia. Broad, 74, the founder of the homebuilder KB Home and the insurer SunAmerica, has donated $2 billion to charitable causes in the past five years, Bloomberg News reported. Among them, $26 million to Michigan State University to build a new art museum on the campus.

link to article


POLAND
Krakow museum founder dies

JTA, August 2, 2007
Krakow - Chris Schwarz, founder and director of the Galicia Jewish Museum in Krakow, has died. Schwartz, 59, died Sunday of prostate cancer in his Krakow apartment. Schwarz, a London native whose father was Jewish, founded the museum in April 2004. It was a cornerstone of the rebirth of Jewish culture in Krakow's Kazimierz district, where hundreds of thousands of Jews lived before World War II.
link to article


UNITED STATES
Holocaust Museum's decision sparks debate over tactics

By Ben Harris
JTA, August 2, 2007
Washington - This week's decision by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum to reference a controversial band of Jewish activists in its permanent exhibition is raising concern among some scholars over the role of outside pressure on the institution.

link to article

GERMANY
Concentration camp in Bavaria re-opened as museum
By The Associated Press
Haaretz, July 22, 2007
Flossenbuerg - Holocaust survivors on Sunday marked the opening of a museum at the Flossenbuerg concentration camp in Germany, 62 years after its liberation.
link to article


CZECH REPUBLIC
Must-See Sites Of The Old Eastern Bloc
by Dina Spritzer
JTA, July 12, 2007
Prague — “Jewish Heritage Travel: A Guide to Eastern Europe,” the new travel guide to the countries of the former Eastern bloc, has comprehensive information about 14 countries in Central and Eastern Europe for those interested in synagogues, cemeteries, museums, and meeting Jews who still live in the region.
link to article

ISRAEL

A new museum confronts an old mystery at Masada
by Danny Rubinstein
Haaretz, July 11, 2007
The exhibit at the end of the tour of the new museum at Masada consists of 11 tiny sherds bearing intriguing names.
link to article


EUROPE
European Day of Culture to take place first week of September

Co-organized by B'nai B'rith Europe, the European Council of Jewish Communities and Red de Juderías de España, the festival takes place every year on the first Sunday in September across Europe. It is based on the concept of an open day event and every year a theme is chosen. The choice of this year's theme, "Testimonies", will enable us to present Jewish culture and heritage as an integral part of our past. We will show the imprints, the marks which have been left by the Jews everywhere they have lived, not only to express their faith, but also to leave a living testimony of their presence as well as of their contribution to the development of their village, city, or region. In 2006 European Day of Jewish Culture resulted in 1,500 activities organized in 270 cities across 30 countries. Roughly 150, 000 visitors were estimated to have participated with 10,000 volunteers donating their time and energy.
For more information please contact Mariano Shlimovich at:
mariano@ecjc.org

ISRAEL
Most of Israel Museum closes for renovations
by Merav Kristal
Ynet, June 27, 2007
Eighty percent of the Israel Museum’s exhibition space is to undergo renovation, with the work to be completed in two-and-a-half years. Most exhibits will be closed to the public, with some transferred to museums abroad and others displayed as changing exhibits.
link to article

UNITED STATES
New York Landmarks Conservancy Lauches Survey of NYC Synagogues
ISJM, June 24, 2007

The New York Landmarks Conservancy, NY's foremost private preservation orgniazation is continuing what will be the most comprehensive study of religious properties ever undertaken in New York City. This summer, the project will complete our survey of Brooklyn's 117 Roman Catholic Churches and will launch a survey of New York City's Jewish Heritage sites. The goal is to identify historic religious properties at risk financially or from development pressures. Conservancy outreach will follow. Survey results will be shared in tours and workshops planned for Fall 2007 through Spring 2008.


UKRAINE
Jewish Leaders Urge Search for Holocaust Mass Graves

Editor: Charles Fenyvesi
UCSJ, Bigotry Monitor: 7:23, June 22, 2007

Following the accidental discovery of a mass grave believed to contain the remains of thousands of Jews killed by the Nazis, angry Ukrainian Jewish leaders demand that their country come clean on the Holocaust, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency (JTA) reported on June 14.
link to article

RUSSIA
Jewish Cemetery Vandalized
Editor: Charles Fenyvesi
UCSJ, Bigotry Monitor: 7:23, June 22, 2007
Vandals painted antisemitic graffiti on the entrance arc of a Jewish cemetery in Petrozavodsk, Russia (Republic of Karelia), according to a June 17 report by the AEN news agency. The antisemitic insults, a swastika, and the emblem of the SS were discovered last week. Last month, a similar act of vandalism took place at the cemetery. Jewish leaders have requested that police launch an investigation.
link to article


UNITED STATES
Alaska Jews to get Jewish Museum
by Haviv Rettig
Jerusalem Post, June 21, 2007
In a US state whose entire population is roughly equal to Tel Aviv's and whose capital cannot be reached by road, the small Jewish community has strengthened its roots with the planned construction of the Alaska Jewish Historical Museum.

link to article

POLAND
Backers of Polish museum hope groundbreaking boosts fund raising
by Dinah A. Spritzer
JTA, June 20, 2007
Supporters and staff of a new museum on Polish Jewry are hoping a high-profile groundbreaking ceremony will draw in the additional funds needed to finish what aims to be Europe's largest Jewish cultural attraction under one roof.
link to article


POLAND
Polish Jewish museum to break ground

JTA
The Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw will break ground June 26. The $58 million museum is set to open between 2009 and 2010. It will showcase the 1,000-year history of Polish Jews, who comprised 10 percent of the country's population before the Holocaust -- more than in any other European nation.
link to article


UKRAINE
Rescuing Drohobych: One Man’s Quest To Memorialize A Vital Jewish Center of Oil and Art

by Samuel D. Gruber

Forward, June 19, 2007
Holocaust survivor Rubin Schmer is working to restore the cemetery, mass grave site and synagogue in his native Drohobych, Ukraine.
link to article

UNITED STATES
Defiance and Dignity
by Rahel Musleah
Hadassah Magazine,
June/July, 2007 Vol. 88 No. 10
Contrary to popular belief, Holocaust victims were far from passive in the face of Nazi abuse, and a new exhibit details how and where they fought back.
link to article

UNITED STATES

A Catalog of Defiance
by Joshua Cohen
Forward, June 13, 2007
"Daring to Resist: Jewish Defiance in the Holocaust" a catalog published to accompany an exhibition of the same title that recently opened at New York&'s Museum of Jewish Heritage, begins with an arresting image of opposition, and pride.
link to article


UNITED STATES
Peering Inside A Jewel Box Of Judaica

by Jeannie Rosenfeld
Forward,
June 13, 2007
link to article


UNITED STATES
Museum exhibit reveals everyday life in the Holy Land

by
Giovanna Dell'Orto, Associated Press Writer
USA Today, June 13, 2007
An exhibit of Holy Land artifacts from the first through sixth centuries starts its last U.S. stop this weekend, offering a striking glimpse into everyday life in what is now Israel at the time when Christianity emerged, as well as a powerful reminder of how rooted Christianity was in Judaism.
link to article


ISRAEL

Holocaust Diary by a Polish Girl Makes Its Debut After 60 Years
by The Associated Press
New York Times, June 5, 2007
The diary of a 14-year-old Jewish girl who is being described as the “Polish Anne Frank” was unveiled Monday by Israel’s Holocaust museum. More than 60 years after the teenager wrote it, the diary vividly describes the world crumbling around her as she came of age in a Jewish ghetto.
link to article


SWITZERLAND

Swiss raid Nazi art thief's bank safe

NZZ, June 3, 2007

At least 14 masterpieces found in a Swiss bank safe belonging to Bruno Lohse, who stole art for the Nazis, have been confiscated as part of a blackmail investigation.
link to article

UNITED STATES
PJA students create museum exhibition

By Deborah Moon
Jewish Review, June 1, 2007

Portland Jewish Academy fifth-graders have gained a new appreciation for museums and their own family's history through the creation of an actual museum exhibit now on display at the Oregon Jewish Museum.
link to article

ISRAEL

On the block: Moshe Dayan's antiquities, at a bargain
by Amiram Barkat
Haaretz, May 28, 2007
A total of 165 archaeological artifacts collected by Moshe Dayan will be auctioned off this morning at a small auction house in the U.S., but prices are being kept down in part because the former general and chief of staff may not have excavated them legally.
link to article


GERMANY

Exhibit Examines Divergent Fates of German-Jewish Exiles
by
Jennifer Abramsohn
Deutsche Welle, May 25, 2007
A new museum exhibit on German Jews who fled their homeland between 1933 and 1941 examines the life-changing -- and ultimately life-saving -- experiences of those who managed to escape the Nazi threat.
link to article

CURACAO
A Birthday Celebration for Curacao's Historic Synagogue

by Samuel D. Gruber
Forward, May 25, 2007
Celebration of the 275th anniversary of the Snoa — Curacao’s venerable synagogue built in 1732, home to Congregation Mikvé Israel-Emanuel, the oldest surviving synagogue in the Americas.
link to article

SPAIN
Spain connects with Jewish history via Sephardic Routes
By Michael Levitin
Los Angeles Times, May 24, 2007
The network of medieval sites links visitors with a past that has been in the shadows for centuries.
A growing number of tourists is coming to Segovia, a city in Spain's Castile region, not only to see its towering Roman aqueduct but also to get a glimpse of a rediscovered Jewish past. "People want to see the Jewish quarter because it's practically unknown — and because they don't expect it," said Marta Rueda, a guide who once led former Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres on a tour through Segovia's old streets.
link to article


ENGLAND
Bristol’s mystery mikveh fails to sell
By Candice Krieger
The Jewish Chronicle, March 08, 2007
Bristol - One of the UK’s oldest Jewish monuments is still for sale after offers made at last week’s auction did not meet the reserve price.
link to article

POLAND
Polish Jews to reopen synagogue in prewar yeshiva Chachmei Lublin
By The Associated Press
Haaretz, February 11, 2007
Lublin - Poland's small Jewish community celebrates another step in its revival Sunday: the reopening of a synagogue in a yeshiva that before World War II was a major center of Jewish learning.
link to article

UNITED STATES
The Temple That Traveled
By Phyllis Myers
Washington Post, August 14, 2005
Mayor Anthony A. Williams's proposal that Metro move its offices from downtown Washington to Anacostia as part of his riverside development initiative is a reminder of the constancy of change in urban neighborhoods and the value of thinking small, as well as big, in redesigning cities.
link to article






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